Debut solo album from Thabang Tabane will continue his father’s legacy of the South African malombo sound

Mushroom Hour Half Hour drops the long awaited solo album – Matjale from Thabang Tabane – next month.

Thabang is the son of the late, legendary Dr Philip Nchipi Tabane and is heir to the South African malombo jazz sound that his father originated and help pioneer in the early 1960s. Malombo specifically refers to traditional ceremonies – where dancing to music occurs during a rite of exorcism or healing – and the drumming styles from these ceremonial roots has influenced jazz musicians to the present day.

Thabang has been touring the world, playing with his father’s band and other South African luminaries – such as Thandiswa Mazwai, Madala Kunene and Mabi Thobejane – since he was 8-years-old..

The Matjale LP drops digitally, on CD and on vinyl on the 14th of September.

Here’s a WTM jazz mix featuring Malombo, Jabula and a range of styles.

Kawuku Sound unites the UK’s Cervo and Contours with Uganda’s underground music scene

The Banana Hill collective will release a scintillating body of music in October after a tour of Uganda – it follows UK producers, Cervo and Contours, securing Arts Council funding last year to undertake a recording project in the capital Kampala.
Banana Hill began as a party in Sheffield, before becoming a label and expanding to clubs all over. With this release the label shows it is becoming even more creative and diverse, as well as showcasing fresh talent.

Chris Knight, aka Cervo, explains the project: “We worked with local percussion troupe Fonkodelis Arkestra as well as traditional instrumentalists, and the outcome of this project is an 8-track album that will be released under the name Kawuku Sound. This process was facilitated by label & festival owners Nyege Nyege at their studio space called Boutiq Studios.

“The music was written and recorded in this shared residency space, home to musicians and visual artists from all over East Africa and beyond, and a hub for Kampala’s underground electronic music scene. Boutiq Studio’s DIY mentality provided the perfect environment for experimentation, allowing the fusion of these disparate sounds. Kawuku Sound is a reflection of this, merging the hypnotic and trance-inducing percussion of Buganda drumming with elements of contemporary electronics and traditional instrumentation.”

The album artwork is a special commission from Nuwa Wamala Nnyanzi, who runs the Nnyanzi Art Studio in Kampala.

Kawuka Sound will be the third release for Banana Hill and will be out on October 8th. It is an extremely accomplished and forward thinking album and follows one of the stand out dance releases of 2017 – the Cervo re-edits of Majid Bekkas on the African Gnaoua Blues 12″ – Banana Hill’s first record.

The latest World Treasures Music radio show features three tracks from this release in the first quarter of the show:

Tracklist

The Last Poets – Understand What Black Is (Mala Instrumental Remix)

Jackson Almond – Open Your Head

Kawuku Sound – Ggaba Road x Jinja To Kampala

Kawuku Sound – Youth ft Spyda MC

Kawuku Sound – Buganda Dub

Aura (Spiritual Emanation) – She Can Turn You On

Aura (Spiritual Emanation) – Ayamaho

A.K. (Ngahiwi Apanui) – He Whakapapa

Charly Boy – 1990

Ras Enoch – Jah’s Rock

Ramzi – Fly Timoun

Loidis – A Parade

DWART – Taipei Disco

Secret Circuit – Stomping Ground

Secret Circuit – Crazy Wayz

Planet Battagon – Moon of Dysnomia

BKO – Dirty Donso

LAPS – Who Me?

LAPS – Ode To Daughter

Roger Melt – Mone La

Amral’s Trinidad Cavalier Orchestra – 90 Percent Of Me Is You

Tohru Aizawa Quartet – Philosopher’s Stone

Il Guardiano Del Faro – Finale

Rainbow Generator – City Of The Sun

Il Guardiano Del Faro – Lady Moon

Il Guardiano Del Faro – Sinfonia Al Sole Che Nasce

Aura’s African boogie funk: the ‘Spiritual Connection’ grail LP is finally reissued by Afrodesia

Ignore this reissue at your peril – as Aura are on fire on their album Spiritual Connection, originally recorded for Afrodesia in Nigeria.

The relatively short lived ‘Aura’ project was spiritually guided by Zee-Tei Debekeme in 1976. The band consisted of the keys of Issac Moore, Omega Garbal on guitar, Casco Mayor on percussion, Afrodisia regular Benna Kemfa (who also was in Ofo Black Company), and Candido Obajimi (Afrika 70 and Tony Allen) provided vocals, beats and drums.

Back in 1976 the LP never received a full release and this repress comes from the only known copy in existence from the Afrodisia masters vault.It’s insane to think that this is only getting its full release 32 years later.

The album itself is a melting pot of African 1970s, dirty funk, wailing synthesisers and chanting, as if it were a live jam throughout.

Aura (Spiritual Emanation) – Spiritual Connection is out now.

Left Ear’s selection of Antipodean Anomalies brings us special music from an “isolating” place

The wait is finally over and Left Ear’s compilation of music from Australia and New Zealand – made in a “unique” time and space in the 1970s and 1980s – is finally here…and these Antipodean Anomalies sound like nothing else.

Compiled by Left Ear Record’s own Chris Bonato and  Umut Turkeri, tracks such as Rainbow Generator’s City Of The Sun is a psychedelic walkabout and is anchored by Balearic ramblings about the beach – but it is the more traditional sounding instrumentation and melodies that elevate this beyond mere new-wave, post-punk or leftfield music.

The duo at Left Ear Records explain how these lesser-known artists have constructed such culturally fused and unique visions in their compositions:

“For musicians inhabiting the Antipodean countries of Australia and New Zealand during the 70’s and 80’s, it was a geographically and culturally isolating environment. Boutique shops, community radio and mail order exchanges championed independent and contemporary music from across the globe. It was, however, this isolation that caused a number of small community-focused scenes to evolve, creating their own unique interpretation and reappropriation of outside influences. Through both these scenes and government initiatives, a vast amount of music emerged on self-released and independent labels.

“Yet, even among small scenes that were creating unique sounds, a number of artists seemed to be making music that was neither here nor there, often meshing together numerous genres and influences to create anomalous sounds.

“Artists like Olev Muska along with Ingrid Slamer meshed traditional folk songs of their Estonian heritage with cutting edge computer technology. Ngahiwi Apanui used his native language of Te Reo and a “cheap drum machine” to create a pulsating tale that highlights the creation of Aotearoa (the Maori name for New Zealand); while the Free Radicals would sing through PVC pipes to construct their vision of post-apocalyptic tribal music. Sydney’s Nic Lyon used his classical training to craft a distinctive gem which matched eastern and African influenced instruments with synchopated drum machines, while artists like Delaney Venn and Toy Division managed to challenge their post-punk sensibilities by blending both dub and atmospheric sounds respectively.”

Once again Left Ear have shown their expert curation and diversity, although looking closer to their Melbourne home than with recent releases – having reissued Kingsley Bucknor’s electro-disco from Nigeria, undiscovered synth legend Omer Coleman (also Starship Commander Woo Woo), fellow U.S countrymen Workdub and their brand of dub experiments, Shahara-Ja’s soulful electro, Yoruba Singers of Guyana, the spaced out jazz-funk of Thesda, the rapso of Brother Resistance, Minoru Hoodoo Fushimi’s blend of Japanese tradition and electro-funk, and Trinidad and Tobago’s Andre Tanker.

Left Ear have also reissued Antipodean artists, including Peter Westheimer and Leong Lau, the latter just receiving a much needed repress. The documentary below provides a window into Lau’s world. You can also click here: for more anomalies from Australia and New Zealand.

New reissue label Time Capsule will focus on personal favourites and cult classics of audiophile community

Time Capsule is a new London based reissue label connected to a community of record collectors from the city’s venue Brilliant Corners and party turned record label, Beauty & The Beat. The label is headed up by Kay Suzuki and each release will be co-curated by one of the community’s music-obsessives. The music will also be beautifully repackaged and restored.

First up is L Guardiano Del Faro’s cult classic Oasis and is picked by Ryota OPP (Meda Fury), It drops next month. Oasis is an Italian proto electronic milestone with sounds moving between oscillating synth passages, out-there prog and psych, as well as space disco.

For the second release, Suzuki will reissue a set of five ’80s tunes from Yuji Toriyama, a Japanese fusion guitarist and composer. Toriyama is perhaps best known for his soundtrack work on video games such as Street Fighter II and Final Fantasy XII

“While there were so many talented Japanese guitarists in the ’80s,” Suzuki says, “Yuji’s production and arrangement in the era were very experimental and raw.”

There is a clear mission statement from Time Capsule – with these two selections already announced – and more vinyl gems can be expected from the precious vaults of a range of music devotees.

The record focusing on Yuji Toriyama, titled Choice Works 1982 – 1985, will land in October with new artwork from graphic designer Ben Arfur. The new sleeve design looks sublime, clearly inspired by Japanese label art and a colour composition that draws a listener to the beauty within.

Time Capsule will release Il Guardiano Del Faro on September 7th and Choice Works 1982 – 1985 on October 5th.

New single from J.P. Bimeni – a royal refugee turned soul survivor in the vein of Otis

Listen to the achingly beautiful soul of J.P Bimeni on  new single I Miss You.

J.P. Bimeni is the Burundian-born singer – who paired with Spanish funk band, Black Belts – sounds like a soul legend in the making.

The ballad sees Bimeni’s vocals in full bloom pitted against a gritty and cinematic sound of epic horns and soaring gospel tones. The track comes from his first ever album entitled Free Me scheduled for release in Autumn 2018.

Bimeni’s story is unique. “Burundi is a country at war with itself and my family is a microcosm of this”, says the singer, who was born to a republican-leaning, high-ranking military official father and a mother who was a descendant of the royal family. When the country’s civil war began in 1993 and became an inter ethnic conflict with massive loss of life, Bimeni was shot through the chest and left on the brink of death. After later hearing that he was on the wanted list from his hospital bed in Kenya he was subsequently poisoned by injection in the hospital.

Amazingly Bimeni recovered and was able to register as a refugee. He applied for a scholarship program run by the UN Refugee Agency and at 16 he left for a college in Wales with a chance of a better life and the opportunity to make music for a living. He is now based in London.

I Miss You is the debut single from J.P. Bimeni and is out now. His debut album Free Me is set for release on Tucxone Records on October 12th.