Sorry Bamba’s ‘Du Mali’ LP is reissued by Africa Seven

The second LP of one of the most pivotal figures in the history of Malian music – Sorry Bamba – is being reissued this month by Africa Seven. His work spans five decades and Mali’s cultural traditions and new musical styles that arose during Mali’s post-Colonial period.

Bamba was born in 1938 in Mopti, dissected by both the Niger and Bani rivers and known for its rich cultural diversity. Bamba’s father was a distinguished veteran of Emperor Samory Toure’s military and a nobleman in Malian society. But this meant young Sorry was forbidden to make music, as under the nation’s caste system music was an art form reserved for the Griots. At the age of ten, Sorry’s parents died and in these traumatic times the young teen found solace in music. He first taught himself to play an African six-holed flute and as he progressed he began to absorb the rich tapestry of music of his surroundings – traditional Malian music, highlife from Ghana, local accordion master Toumani Toure, as well as European singers and musicians.

In 1957 Sorry formed his first band, Group Goumbe, named after a popular Ivory Coast dance style. In 1960 when Mali gained independence from France, Bamba and his group benefited from a new openness toward local music on the state-run radio network Radio Mali. Sorry then went on to form two award-winning collectives – Bani Jazz and later the Kanaga Orchestra. They fused Latin jazz, Western R&B, psychedelic and funk, as well as traditional Malian styles, making them a favourite in Mali and beyond.

The re-issue benefits from extensive restoration and re-mastering.

Check out Africa Seven for previous re-issues of Sorry Bamba’s third and first LP.

Check out the recent Africa Seven feature on KMAH Radio.

Africa Seven label feature

Check out the latest World Treasures Music show on Kmah Radio.

Featuring exclusive new material from the forthcoming Dimensions label, Esa’s bass rumbler on Dekmental, Balearic’s Social’s latest from Mori Ra, a jazz dancer from the newly reissued Rubén González LP, dopeness from Heavenly Sweetness’ latest Beach Diggin’ compilation and a full hour of reissues and remixes from  Africa Seven.

Hour 1:

(1) Mim Suleiman – Pole Pole (forthcoming on new Dimension label: An Introduction Part 1)  (2) Universo – Umhlaba  (3) Alma Negra – Onga (forthcoming on new Dimension label: An Introduction Part 1)  (4) Esa & NarchBeats – Blast (ft. Pendo Zawose) (Dekmantel)  (5) Komodo Kolektif – Night Of The Leyak (new on Invisible Inc.)  (6) Mori Ra – Chuva (Balearic Social)  (7) Ruben Gonzalez – Cumbanchero  (8) Jemaa – Bob Marley (from Beach Diggin’ Volume 4)  (9) O.R.E.A. – Desintegration-France (from Beach Diggin’ Volume 4)  (10) Sue Barker – Love To The People (from Beach Diggin’ Volume 4)

Hour 2:

Africa Seven feature

(11) AKA – Shake Me

(12) Pasteur Lappe – Na Real Sekele Fo Ya

(13) Ifang Bondi – Atis-A-Tis

(14) Sory Bamba – Kanaga 78

(15) African Black – Nzango

(16) Ekambi Brilliant – Africa Africa

(17) Afro National – Jokenge (IG Culture Edit)

(18) Ekambi Brilliant – Soul Castle (Silkie Edit Over Dub)

(19) M Bamina – Mosi Zole (EVM Edit Overdub)

(20) Manu Dibango – Les Cavaliers (Plaid Edit Over Dub)

(21) Bunzu Soundz – Zinabu (Moody Boyz Edit Refix)

(22) Manu Dibango – Big Blow

African Funk Experimentals: choice cuts from Africa Seven

The rapidly growing Africa Seven label release their second edition of African Funk Experimentals 1979-1981 following their Tala AM release. This comp features the best of Cameroonian musician Pasteur Lappe’s Afro-fusion, sounding very fresh today and in keeping with the current wave of all things tropical.

Nicolas “Pasteur” Lappe found popularity on Radio Adele in Douala, Cameroon. Then become the editor of Douala Gazette newspaper. He also promoted new and upcoming local Cameroonian talent.

After moving to Paris, a stint in journalism school and publishing a book of poems Chansons Negres, he finally settled into a new life of music. It’s exactly the kind of back story we love at WTM. Expect percussive, bass-driven Sekele grooves and proto-zouk, influences of calypso and jazz, synthy funk and lots inbetween. Check!

More at Africa Seven.